August 27, 2014
I’ve spent the last 3 years in hiding

I didn’t realize it until recently. Its a fantastically painful realization I stumbled upon while in Kentucky. 

The last few years of my life have been dedicated to my commitment to prison theatre and doing performance and theatre based work with inmates. I have written one-acts, performed for and with, directed, and pursued pen pal correspondences with inmates around the US. 

I love doing prison theatre work. It challenges me as a scholar, a theatre artist, and as a human in this world just trying to make something of myself and leave my mark on this world. The people I have met in prisons have changed me for the better. They inspire me and they push me to follow my dreams. 

As I reflect on this summer I can see myself having slowly awakened once again. I had many frustrating and fruitful opportunities placed in my lap. I directed a play at my university; I worked in a juvenile hall/home for boys doing performance work; I presented at my first professional academic conference; I published a book review for an academic journal; I lived two weeks in Kentucky at a playhouse working with inmates in an adult prison on a production of inmate written one-acts. I learned how to take charge, even when I am scared. I learned to trust my artistic intuitions by coalescing them with many years of theatre training and research. I slowly broke down a small wall I had been building preventing me from taking risks that come with being vulnerable, and consequently preventing me from experiencing the passions and joys that might come as well.

I fear I have used prison theatre as an excuse and shield from the disappointments and rejection that come with being a performer. One thing I love most about prison theatre is that there are expectations for creating great works, but no expectations for what great might look like. This is fantastic but as left me stagnant and content with myself as an artist. In other words, I love prison theatre because its focus lies in what I appreciate most about theatre, and that is the process. It is one of the safest places I have found when doing performance work, which allows for great risks to take place. However, with this work comes the obligation to be well informed about the politics of the prison-industrial complex, and a complex understanding of what exactly performance is and can do. Because of that obligation (which can be painstakingly time consuming), because of the need for this work, and because of past insecurities it seems I neglected my own personal dreams and desires to continue honing my craft.

I want to perform. I crave the connections, the process, the performances, the comradery, the hard work, the emotional outlet, the opening nights, the closing nights, and the power that comes from being on stage myself. I was teased with a small, yet, familiar taste of the theatre world I knew when I was younger, and thus my dedication and fire for acting has been reignited. I miss it. Thus, I selfishly turn my focus back to me as an actress. This year I have goals to finally get some professional headshots, audition for paid summer work as an actor, audition for MFA graduate acting programs and conservatories, and confidently rejoin the social sphere on… Facebook (rolls eyes), where I can begin marketing myself again as an active member of the theatre world. 

I refuse to abandon my work in prisons. This work is certainly something I see myself doing for many years to come. Theoretically I aim to offer inmates a platform where they can be heard. Realistically it feels as though I have sacrificed that very thing. There must be a happy medium, in fact I know there is… I have an obligation to myself, to follow my dreams so I might be the best me I can be for myself, and for the inmates I may be blessed to do theatre with in the future.

Here’s to a new school year, goals, and drive! Wish me luck! I am going to need it.

-DG 

August 27, 2014
http://americawakiewakie.com/post/95575954348/tumblr-is-full-of-user-handles-with-the-word

america-wakiewakie:

Tumblr is full of user-handles with the word liberty — liberty this, liberty that, yadda yadda yadda — but when you visit their pages you clearly get the impression of a bunch of white dudes oblivious to, or in total denial about, systems of oppression. So in fact what they drone on and on about…

August 27, 2014
ourtimeorg:

Agreed.

ourtimeorg:

Agreed.

(via upworthy)

August 26, 2014
ourtimeorg:

Well said!

ourtimeorg:

Well said!

August 26, 2014
"The police have to be one step ahead of the criminal element, have to be prepared for the worst-case scenario. You don’t want a community to be taken over by one or many criminals."

Lobbyist and NTOA Executive Director Mark Lomax

Police lobbyists aren’t going to let demilitarization happen that easily 

(via micdotcom)

August 26, 2014
http://americawakiewakie.com/post/95317330913/policing-is-a-racist-classist-institution-it

america-wakiewakie:

Policing is a racist, classist institution. It cannot be separated from white supremacy or capitalism. We have to understand the social circumstances we as people of color live through are direct consequences of the economic system we live in, and the political system in place which upholds it….

August 26, 2014
fuckyeahkropotkin:

The State: It’s Historic Role | Peter Kropotkin

The state - centralised, coercive authority - is there not just to keep law and order or to settle disputes, but to promote, uphold and defend systems of social and economic inequality - in other words, class interests. According to the author of this seminal anarchist text there is only one way of really understanding the State, and that is to study its historic development. That is just what Kropotkin does in this brilliant, erudite and provocative essay. In subjecting the build-up of statist forms of power to his critical analysis he demonstrates a radical and comprehensive understanding both of the nature of the state and the social conditions that support it.


My next book… I’m very curious. 

fuckyeahkropotkin:

The State: It’s Historic Role | Peter Kropotkin

The state - centralised, coercive authority - is there not just to keep law and order or to settle disputes, but to promote, uphold and defend systems of social and economic inequality - in other words, class interests. According to the author of this seminal anarchist text there is only one way of really understanding the State, and that is to study its historic development. That is just what Kropotkin does in this brilliant, erudite and provocative essay. In subjecting the build-up of statist forms of power to his critical analysis he demonstrates a radical and comprehensive understanding both of the nature of the state and the social conditions that support it.

My next book… I’m very curious. 

(via herbivorexvx)

August 25, 2014
sancophaleague:

You know it’s really disheartening to think of the state of Black people today. We’ve been so misled that we no longer know who we are. We come from greatness. To be black is powerful yet today we are forced to walk around holding signs up begging for White folks to be merciful to us. We do nothing but beg for White acceptance. An innocent black boy is murdered by police and we respond with petitions, marches, and shouts for help. We fight in their armies and in their wars but when it comes time for us to take some action, we want to be nonviolent and march. The saddest part is when you try and tell black people that we shouldn’t be living like this, a lot of us don’t won’t to hear it, but regardless it’s the truth. As @solar_innerg once said, we are always trying to prove to White folks that we’re human. We gotta do better. We can be more…. Post by @KingKwajo

sancophaleague:

You know it’s really disheartening to think of the state of Black people today. We’ve been so misled that we no longer know who we are. We come from greatness. To be black is powerful yet today we are forced to walk around holding signs up begging for White folks to be merciful to us. We do nothing but beg for White acceptance. An innocent black boy is murdered by police and we respond with petitions, marches, and shouts for help. We fight in their armies and in their wars but when it comes time for us to take some action, we want to be nonviolent and march. The saddest part is when you try and tell black people that we shouldn’t be living like this, a lot of us don’t won’t to hear it, but regardless it’s the truth. As @solar_innerg once said, we are always trying to prove to White folks that we’re human. We gotta do better. We can be more….
Post by @KingKwajo

August 25, 2014

micdotcom:

Potent minimalist art sends a strong message about police and vigilante brutality in America

Journalist and artist Shirin Barghi has created a gripping, thought-provoking series of graphics that not only examines racial prejudice in today’s America, but also captures the sense of humanity that often gets lost in news coverage. Titled “Last Words,” the graphics illustrate the last recorded words by Brown and other young black people — Trayvon Martin, Oscar Grant and others — who have been killed by police in recent years.

Let us not forget their voices

(via america-wakiewakie)

August 25, 2014
"It is illegal for women to go topless in most cities, yet you can buy a magazine of a woman without her top on at any 7-11 store. So, you can sell breasts, but you cannot wear breasts, in America."

Violet Rose (via c-icatrix)

This is one of my favorite quotes about sexualization/objectification vs autonomy of female bodies bc it’s so succinct

(via platonicsbeforeerotics)

(Source: screamingfemale, via greenseaweed)

August 25, 2014
azspot:


David Horsey

azspot:

David Horsey

August 24, 2014

micdotcom:

5 disturbing facts about police militarization in America

Those cops in riot armor beating and tear-gassing protesters in Ferguson didn’t drop out of thin air. As American police continue to receive billions in military-grade equipment free or subsidized by the Pentagon and Homeland Security, they’ve predictably started to act more like a military force in hostile territory than the public’s protectors.

Facts from ACLU report show just how big the problem has become Follow micdotcom

(via upworthy)

August 24, 2014

america-wakiewakie:

Happening Now! Oakland, CA, August 20th, 2014, marches in solidarity with Ferguson. Justice for Mike Brown!

August 24, 2014


This girl was crying and begging the policeman not to hit her or any of her friends. Then the policeman started crying as well and he said to her: “You just hold on girl.”
The photo comes from protests happening in Bulgaria right now. Students are protesting poverty and corruption in Bulgaria’s Socialist-backed government, chaining themselves to the doors of Sofia University and clashing with police outside of parliament.
After the photo was taken it quickly went viral

this picture is so powerful

This girl was crying and begging the policeman not to hit her or any of her friends. Then the policeman started crying as well and he said to her: “You just hold on girl.”

The photo comes from protests happening in Bulgaria right now. Students are protesting poverty and corruption in Bulgaria’s Socialist-backed government, chaining themselves to the doors of Sofia University and clashing with police outside of parliament.

After the photo was taken it quickly went viral

this picture is so powerful

(Source: thinksquad, via coffeeeyes-laceythighs)

August 24, 2014
vizual-statistix:

The USA imprisons a lot of people; it has more than 700 prisoners per 100k population.  As a country, its imprisonment rate is second only to Seychelles (which is a small African country comprising many islands with only 90k people). The USA has 21.7% of the global prisoner population, but only 4.4% of the total global population. So is the USA legal system too effective? Or are other countries’ systems not effective enough?   
This graphic puts the issue into perspective. The area of each country’s rectangle is proportional to the total number of prisoners it has. The value for the color is normalized using each country’s population (prisoners per 100k people).
Data source: http://www.prisonstudies.org/highest-to-lowest/prison-population-total

vizual-statistix:

The USA imprisons a lot of people; it has more than 700 prisoners per 100k population.  As a country, its imprisonment rate is second only to Seychelles (which is a small African country comprising many islands with only 90k people). The USA has 21.7% of the global prisoner population, but only 4.4% of the total global population. So is the USA legal system too effective? Or are other countries’ systems not effective enough?   

This graphic puts the issue into perspective. The area of each country’s rectangle is proportional to the total number of prisoners it has. The value for the color is normalized using each country’s population (prisoners per 100k people).

Data source: http://www.prisonstudies.org/highest-to-lowest/prison-population-total

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